Reference by the Court of Appeal in Northern Ireland pursuant to Paragraph 33 of Schedule 10 to the Northern Ireland Act 1998 (Abortion)

Cite as:[2018] UKSC 27
Hand-down Date:June 07, 2018
 
FREE EXCERPT

Trinity Term [2018] UKSC 27 On appeal from: [2017] NICA 42

JUDGMENT

In the matter of an application by the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission for Judicial

Review (Northern Ireland)

Reference by the Court of Appeal in Northern Ireland pursuant to Paragraph 33 of Schedule 10 to the Northern Ireland Act 1998 (Abortion) (Northern Ireland) before

Lady Hale, President Lord Mance

Lord Kerr Lord Wilson Lord Reed Lady Black Lord Lloyd-Jones JUDGMENT GIVEN ON 7 June 2018 Heard on 24, 25 and 26 October 2017 Appellant

(NIHRC)

Respondent (1) (Department of Justice)

Tony McGleenan QC Paul McLaughlin BL Emma McIlveen BL (Instructed by Departmental Solicitors Office, Department of Finance and Personnel) Nathalie Lieven QC Laura McMahon BL

David Blundell

(Instructed by Northern Ireland Human Rights

Commission)

Respondent (2) (Attorney General for Northern Ireland)

John F Larkin QC Attorney General for NI Martin Chamberlain QC Denise Kiley BL (Instructed by Office of The Attorney General for Northern Ireland) Interveners Counsel details Instructed by 1st Intervener - Humanists

UK

Caoilfhionn Gallagher QC Fiona Murphy Mary-Rachel McCabe Bhatt Murphy Helen Mountfield QC Zoe Leventhal

Anita Davies Frances Raday Deighton Pierce Glynn Karen Quinlivan QC Sean Devine BL Stephen Chambers Solicitors Ltd Monye Anyadike-Danes QC Adam Straw KRW Law Mark Hill QC MW Solicitors Lord Goldsmith QC Debevoise and Plimpton LLP

(Written submissions only) 2nd Intervener -

United Nations Working Group on the Issue of Discrimination Against Women in Law and Practice

3rd Intervener - (JR76)

4th Interveners -

(a) Sarah Ewart

(b) Amnesty International

5th Interveners -

(a) Christian Action and Research in Education (CARE)

(b) ADF International (UK)

(c) Professor Patricia Casey

6th Intervener - Centre of Reproductive Rights

7th Interveners -

(a) Family Planning Association

(b) British Pregnancy Advisory Service

(c) Abortion Support Network

(d) Birthrights

(e) Royal College of Midwives

(f) Alliance for Choice

(g) Antenatal Results and Choices

Dinah Rose QC Jude Bunting Leigh Day Brett Lockhart QC Napier and Son Solicitors (Written submissions only) Adrian Colmer BL Hewitt and Gilpin Solicitors (Written submissions only) Jason Coppel QC Equality and Human Rights Commission

(Written submissions only) 8th Intervener - Bishops of the Roman Catholic Dioceses in Northern Ireland

9th Intervener - The Society for the Protection of Unborn Children (SPUC)

10th Intervener - Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC)

LADY HALE:

  1. This has proved an unusually difficult case to resolve. Not only are the substantive issues, relating to the compatibility of abortion law in Northern Ireland with articles 3 and 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights (the ECHR or the Convention), of considerable depth and sensitivity; but there is also the procedural issue raised by the Attorney General for Northern Ireland, who challenges the standing of the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission (NIHRC) to bring these proceedings. The court is divided on both questions, but in different ways.

  2. On the substantive compatibility issues, a majority - Lord Mance, Lord Kerr, Lord Wilson and I - hold that the current law is incompatible with the right to respect for private and family life, guaranteed by article 8 of the Convention, insofar as it prohibits abortion in cases of rape, incest and fatal foetal abnormality. Lady Black agrees with that holding in the case of fatal foetal abnormality. Lord Kerr and Lord Wilson also hold that it is incompatible with the right not to be subjected to inhuman or degrading treatment, guaranteed by article 3 of the Convention. Lord Reed and Lord Lloyd-Jones hold that the law is not incompatible with either article 8 or article

  3. On the procedural issue, a majority - Lord Mance, Lord Reed, Lady Black and Lord Lloyd-Jones - hold that the NIHRC does not have standing to bring these proceedings and accordingly that this court has no jurisdiction to make a declaration of incompatibility to reflect the majority view on the compatibility issues. A minority - Lord Kerr, Lord Wilson and I - hold that the NIHRC does have standing and would have made a declaration of incompatibility.

  4. In these unusual circumstances, it is not possible to follow our usual practice and identify a single lead judgment which represents the majority view on all issues. We have therefore decided to revert to the previous practice of the appellate committee of the House of Lords and print the judgments in order of seniority. It is for that reason only that my judgment comes first. Far more substantial judgments on all issues follow from Lord Mance and Lord Kerr.

    Introduction

  5. The substantive questions in this case are legal issues - specifically related to the implementation in UK law, by the Human Rights Act 1998 (HRA), of the ECHR,

    Page 3

    which in turn has to be interpreted in the light of other international treaties to which the UK is a party, in this case the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women 1979 (CEDAW) and the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities 2006 (CRPD). Moral and political issues, important though they undoubtedly are, are relevant only to the extent that they are relevant to the legal issues which have to be resolved.

  6. The starting point for any discussion of the legal issues has to be the right of all human beings, male and female, to decide what shall be done with their own bodies. This right has long been recognised by the common law: it is the reason why consent is needed for invasive medical treatment however well-intentioned: see Montgomery v Lanarkshire Health Board (General Medical Council intervening) [2015] AC 1430. It is also recognised by the ECHR: see Pretty v United Kingdom (2002) 35 EHRR 1, where it was said that "the notion of personal autonomy is an important principle underlying the interpretation of its guarantees" (para 61). For many women, becoming pregnant is an expression of that autonomy, the fulfilment of a deep-felt desire. But for those women who become pregnant, or who are obliged to carry a pregnancy to term, against their will there can be few greater invasions of their autonomy and bodily integrity.

  7. The point is vividly made in Professor Thomson's famous article ("A Defence of Abortion", reprinted in R M Dworkin (ed), The Philosophy of Law):

    "You wake up in the morning and find yourself back to back in bed with an unconscious violinist. A famous unconscious violinist. He has been found to have a fatal kidney ailment, and the Society of Music Lovers has canvassed all the available medical records and found that you alone have the right blood type to help. They have therefore kidnapped you, and last night the violinist's circulatory system was plugged into yours, so that your kidneys can be used to extract poisons from his blood as well as your own. The director of the hospital now tells you, 'Look, we're sorry the Society of Music Lovers did this to you - we would never have permitted it had we known. But still, they did it, and the violinist is now plugged into you. To unplug you would be to kill him. But never mind, it's only for nine months. By then he will have recovered from his ailment, and can be safely unplugged from you'."

    There can be no doubt that the grossest invasion of your legal rights has taken place: the question is whether you are now under a legal duty to endure that invasion for the next nine months.

    Page 4

  8. By definition we are here considering the cases of women and girls who either did not want to become pregnant at all, or having experienced the joy of a wanted pregnancy, have reached the agonising conclusion that because of the foetal abnormalities, they do not wish to carry the pregnancy to term. There will of course be women who decide that they do wish to continue the pregnancy despite the circumstances. Any woman or girl who finds herself in such a situation and wants an abortion will have made her own moral choice, often a very difficult moral choice. The question is whether others, many of whom will never be placed in that situation, are entitled to make a different moral choice for her, and impose upon her a legal obligation to carry the pregnancy to term.

  9. The present law, contained in sections 58 and 59 of the Offences Against the Person Act 1861, an Act of the UK Parliament, and section 25(1) of the Criminal Justice Act (NI) 1945, an Act of the Northern Ireland legislature, does impose that obligation upon her, unless there is a risk to her life or of serious long-term or permanent injury to her physical or mental health. Indeed, it does more than that. It has, as the United Nations Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women has recently pointed out, a "chilling effect" upon clinicians, who are reluctant to discuss the options for fear of being thought to "aid, abet, counsel or procure" an abortion which might be unlawful. It also discourages women who have had abortions, lawful or unlawful, from seeking proper after-care, because of section 5 of the Criminal Law Act (NI) 1967: anyone who knows or believes that an offence has been committed and has information which might be of material assistance in securing the apprehension, prosecution, or conviction of the person who committed it, commits an offence if they fail without reasonable excuse to give that information to the police within a reasonable time. The Departmental Guidance for Health and Social Care Professionals on Termination of Pregnancy in Northern Ireland (March 2016) draws professionals' attention to both these risks. The Royal Colleges of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, of Midwives and of Nursing described the 2013 draft as intimidating for women and for professionals and the CEDAW Committee found that the finalised Guidance "perpetuates such intimidation" (Report of the inquiry concerning the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland under article 8 of the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, CEDAW/C/OP.8/GBR/1, published 23 February 2018, para 18).

  10. This being the state of the law in Northern Ireland, it is not suggested that this Court can strike it down or interpret it out of existence. The only question is whether it is incompatible with either article 3 or article 8 of the ECHR and whether the Court both can and should declare it so. The first question, therefore, is whether the NIHRC has standing to bring these proceedings.

    Page 5

    Standing

  11. This is an arid question, because there is no doubt that the NIHRC could readily have found women who either are or would be victims of an unlawful act under the Human Rights Act 1998 and either supported or intervened in proceedings brought by those women. The relevant sections of the Northern Ireland Act 1998, which established the Commission, are set out in full in paras 48, 49 and 50 of Lord Mance's judgment.

  12. Under section 69(5) of the Northern Ireland Act 1998, the NIHRC may do two things: the first is to give assistance to individuals in accordance with section 70 (section 69(5)(a)). Section 70 applies to proceedings involving law or practice relating to the protection of human rights which a person in Northern Ireland has brought or wishes to bring (section 70(1)(a)) or proceedings in which such a person relies or wishes to rely on such law or practice (section 70(1)(b)). This will clearly encompass, not only actions brought under section 7(1)(a) of the HRA, but also other proceedings in which a person wishes to rely on the HRA; the latter must include cases such as Ghaidan v Godin-Mendoza [2004] 2 AC 557, in which there was no suggestion of an unlawful act by a public authority but the court was being asked to construe certain provisions of the Rent Act 1977 compatibly with the Convention rights.

  13. The second thing that the NIHRC may do is to "bring proceedings involving law or practice relating to the protection of human rights" (section 69(5)(b)). Unlike section 69(5)(a), there is no cross-reference to another section of the Act which might limit the breadth of that power. Nevertheless, it is argued that the power is limited by section 71, which is headed "Restrictions on application of rights".

  14. The first thing to notice about section 71 is that it is directed to sections 6(2)(c) or 24(1)(a) of the Northern Ireland Act (set out in para 51 of Lord Mance's judgment). Section 71(1) provides that nothing in those sections shall enable a person to bring any proceedings on the ground that "any legislation or act" is incompatible with the Convention rights or to rely on any of the Convention rights in any such proceedings unless he would be regarded as a victim of the legislation or act in the European Court of Human Rights in Strasbourg. Section 6(2)(c) provides that an Act of the Northern Ireland Assembly is outside its competence (and thus "not law" under section 6(2)) if it is incompatible with any of the Convention rights. Section 71(3) limits the scope of that prohibition. Section 24(1)(a) provides that a Minister or Northern Ireland department has no power to make, confirm or approve any subordinate legislation, or to do any act, so far as the legislation or act is incompatible with any of the Convention rights. Section 71(4) similarly limits the scope of that prohibition. The aim of section 71(1) was thus to prevent private persons bringing proceedings to challenge Acts of the Assembly,

    Page 6

    subordinate Northern Irish legislation or executive acts unless they could claim to be victims. But, under section 71(2), the principal Law Officers of England, Northern Ireland and Scotland could bring such proceedings.

  15. It is not clear why the original version of section 71(1) (set out in para 175 of Lord Kerr's judgment) referred to section 69(5)(b), but it had the effect of preventing the NIHRC bringing proceedings to challenge "any legislation or act", because the NIHRC could never (or hardly ever) claim to be a victim of such legislation or act. That defect was recognised by the House of Lords in In re Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission [2002] NI 236 and the problem dealt with by deleting the reference to section 69(5)(b) in section 71(1) and expressly providing in section 71(2A) that the prohibition did not apply to the NIHRC. It is clear, therefore, that the NIHRC has power to challenge "any legislation or act" without being its victim.

  16. Sections 71(2B) and (2C) go on to deal with the Commission's instituting or intervening in "human rights proceedings". Section 71(2B)(a) makes it clear that the Commission itself need not be a victim "of the unlawful act to which the proceedings relate". But section 71(2B)(c) provides that the Commission "may act only if there is or would be one or more victims of the unlawful act". By section 71(2C) "human rights proceedings" means proceedings under section 7(1)(b) of the HRA or under section 69(5)(b) of the Northern Ireland Act. Section 7(1)(b) refers to claims that a public authority has acted or proposes to act incompatibly with a Convention right, which claims may be relied on in any legal proceedings, but only if the person making the claim is or would be a victim of the unlawful act. Construing the subsection as a whole, the reference to "proceedings under section 69(5)(b)" must mean proceedings brought by the NIHRC claiming that a public authority has acted or proposes to act incompatibly with a Convention right. It then makes perfect sense for section 71(2B)(c) to provide that the NIHRC can only bring proceedings in respect of an unlawful act if there is or would be a real victim of such an act.

  17. But we know that the Human Rights Act provides two different methods of seeking to ensure compliance with the Convention rights. One is for victims to bring proceedings in respect of an unlawful act of a public authority, or to rely on such an unlawful act in other proceedings, pursuant to section 7(1) of the HRA. The other is to challenge the compatibility of legislation under sections 3 and 4 of the HRA, irrespective of whether there has been any unlawful act by a public authority. This may be done in proceedings between private persons, as in Wilson v First County Trust (No 2) [2004] 1 AC 816 and Ghaidan v Godin-Mendoza. But it may also be done in judicial review proceedings brought by person with sufficient standing to do so. A current example is Steinfeld v Secretary of State for Education [2017] 3 WLR 1237, where the provisions in the Civil Partnership Act 2004 limiting civil partnerships to same sex couples are under challenge. The NIHRC clearly has standing to bring such proceedings by virtue of section 69(5)(b).

    Page 7

  18. In my view, therefore, section 71(2B) and (2C) are dealing only with proceedings brought by the NIHRC, or interventions by the NIHRC in proceedings brought by others, in respect of claims that a public authority has acted or proposes to act unlawfully. Not surprisingly it requires that there be an identifiable victim of such an unlawful act. But it does not apply to or limit the general power of the NIHRC to challenge the compatibility of legislation of any sort under sections 3 and 4 of the HRA. This would be clearer still if the words "if any" were inserted after "unlawful act" in section 71(2B)(c), but it is in my view clear that "the unlawful act" means "the unlawful act alleged in the proceedings", so it does not apply where no such unlawful act is alleged. For the reasons given by Lord Kerr, it would be very surprising if it did limit the NIHRC's power to bring such a challenge. It is to my mind clear that the Equality and Human Rights Commission in Great Britain, albeit operating under different legislation (set out in para 63 of Lord Mance's judgment), does have that power, so there can be no objection in principle.

    Article 8

  19. I propose first to address the compatibility of Northern Ireland abortion law with article 8 of the ECHR, because it is common ground that the current law is indeed an interference with the right of pregnant women and girls to respect for their private lives which is guaranteed by article 8(1). The question is whether in terms of article 8(2) it is justified because it is "in accordance with the law and is necessary in a democratic society ... for the protection of health or morals, or for the protection of the rights and freedoms of others". In answering the second part of that question, it is now customary to ask whether the measure in question has a legitimate aim, is rationally connected to that aim, and is a proportionate means of achieving it. For the reasons given by Lord Kerr and Lord Mance, I agree that such interference is not justified, but would like to make a few points of my own.

  20. Although the current state of the law has been criticised for its lack of clarity - and is certainly not as clear as is the law in the rest of the UK - it is no more uncertain than many other areas of the law which rely upon the application of particular concepts - in this case a risk to life or of serious and prolonged or permanent injury to physical or mental health - to the facts of a particular case. It is also sufficiently accessible to those affected by it for the interference to be "in accordance with the law" for this purpose.

  21. It is more difficult to articulate the legitimate aim. It cannot be protecting the rights and freedoms of others, because the unborn are not the holders of rights under the Convention (Vo v France (2004) 40 EHRR 12) or under domestic law (In re MB (Medical Treatment) [1997] 2 FLR 426). But the community undoubtedly does have a moral interest in protecting the life, health and welfare of the unborn - it is that interest which underlies many areas of the law, including the regulation of assisted

    Page 8

    reproduction, and of the practice of midwifery, as well as of the termination of pregnancy. But the community also has an interest in protecting the life, health and welfare of the pregnant woman - that interest also underlies the regulation of assisted reproduction, of midwifery and of the termination of pregnancy. And pregnant women are undoubtedly rights-holders under the both the Convention and domestic law with autonomy as well as health and welfare rights. The question, therefore, is how the balance is to be struck between the two.

  22. Where there is no consensus of opinion among the member states of the European Union, the Strasbourg court will usually allow individual member states a wide (though not unlimited) "margin of appreciation" when undertaking such balancing exercises. In A, B and C v Ireland (2010) 53 EHRR 13, the majority of the Grand Chamber of the Strasbourg court took the unusual step of holding that the margin of appreciation allowed to Ireland had not been "decisively narrowed", despite the existence of a consensus amongst a substantial majority of the contracting States allowing abortion on wider grounds than those allowed under Irish law (which was and, for the time being at least, remains even narrower than the law in Northern Ireland). The majority felt able to do this because the prohibition was based on the "profound moral views of the Irish people as to the nature of life" and women had the right "to lawfully travel abroad for an abortion with access to appropriate information and medical care in Ireland" (para 241). The minority (of six) pointed out that this was the first time that the court had disregarded a European consensus on the basis of "profound moral views" and considered it a "real and dangerous new departure", even assuming those views were still well embedded in the conscience of the Irish people (para O-III11).

  23. Two of the women in the A, B and C case were seeking abortions on what were described as "health and well-being grounds": the majority found no violation. The third was concerned that continuing her pregnancy might endanger her life because she had cancer: the Court found a violation of the State's positive obligation to secure effective respect for her private life because there was no accessible and effective procedure by which she could have established whether she qualified for a lawful abortion in Ireland.

  24. The position in this case is quite different. In the first place, there is no evidence that the profound moral views of the people of Northern Ireland are against allowing abortion in the three situations under discussion here. Quite the reverse. There is a remarkably consistent series of public opinion polls showing majority support for abortion in these circumstances. The most recent survey was a serious academic study, more rigorous than a conventional opinion poll (the results of the Northern Ireland Life and Times Survey are set out in para 110 of Lord Mance's judgment). This evidence cannot be lightly dismissed when the argument is that profound moral views of the public are sufficient to outweigh the grave interference with the rights of the pregnant women entailed in making them continue their

    Page 9

    pregnancies to term even though they, by definition, have reached a different moral conclusion - no doubt, for many, an agonising one.

  25. In the second place, we are dealing with three very different situations from those with which the A, B and C case was concerned, situations in which it cannot seriously be contended that a pregnant woman has a duty to carry the pregnancy to term. In the case of rape, not only did she not consent to becoming pregnant, she did not consent to the act of intercourse which made her pregnant, a double invasion of her autonomy and the right to respect for her private life. In this connection, it is worth noting that the Sexual Offences (Northern Ireland) Order 2008 labels two offences rape: article 5 makes it the offence of rape intentionally to penetrate, inter alia, a vagina with a penis where the woman does not consent and the man does not reasonably believe that she consents; article 12 makes it the offence of rape of a child intentionally to penetrate a person under 13 with a penis, irrespective of consent or a belief in consent; both offences carry a maximum of life imprisonment. Article 16 is labelled "Sexual activity with a child" and makes it an offence for a person of 18 or older intentionally to touch another person where the touching is sexual and that other person is either under 16 and the toucher does not reasonably believe that she is 16 or over or she is under 13. If the touching involves penetration of a vagina with a penis, the offence carries a maximum sentence of 14 years imprisonment. Thus the only difference between the article 16 offence and the article 12 offence is that, if the child is 13 or over but under 16, no offence is committed if the penetrator reasonably believed that she was 16 or over. Consent or reasonable belief in consent does not feature in either offence. Thus it is conclusively presumed in the law of Northern Ireland that children under 16 are incapable of giving consent to sexual touching, including penetration of the vagina by a penis. It is difficult, therefore, to see any reason to distinguish between the offences under article 12 and article 16 for the purpose of this discussion, nor indeed to exclude pregnancies which would be the result of an offence under article 16 were it not for the penetrator's reasonable belief that the child was 16 or over: she is still deemed incapable of giving a real consent to it.

  26. The claim refers only to "rape" and "incest" (as well as foetal abnormality) but there is no longer any offence labelled "incest" in Northern Ireland law. There is, however, an offence under article 32 of the 2008 Order labelled "Sexual activity with a child family member" which follows the same pattern as article 16: it covers sexual touching of a child whom the toucher knows or can reasonably be expected to know is related in the defined ways; if the child is 13 but under 18 the toucher must not believe that she is 18 or over; no such exception applies if the child is under 13; the offence carries a maximum penalty of 14 years' imprisonment if the touching involves penetration, inter alia, of the vagina. Article 68 creates an offence labelled "Sex with an adult relative: penetration" and article 69 creates an offence of consenting to such penetration. Thus the criminal law covers (in substance) the same ground as was previously covered by the law of incest. I see no reason to exclude

    Page 10

    pregnancies which are the result of the offences created by articles 16, 32 and 68 from this discussion. Nor do I see any reason to treat child pregnancies resulting from penetration by a relative any differently from child pregnancies arising in other circumstances. Adult pregnancies are different, because there may have been genuine consent to the penetration. But the giving of that consent is itself an offence, and so the law should not treat it on the same footing as a real consent. Furthermore, as Lord Mance has convincingly demonstrated, there is good evidence that most intra-familial sexual relationships are abusive. And once again, by definition we are discussing a woman who does not consent to the pregnancy: she has made a conscious choice that she does not wish to continue with it.

  27. These are all, therefore, situations in which the autonomy rights of the pregnant woman should prevail over the community's interest in the continuation of the pregnancy. I agree, for the reasons given by Lord Kerr and Lord Mance, that in denying a lawful termination of her pregnancy in Northern Ireland to those women and girls in these situations who wish for it, the law is incompatible with their Convention rights. I agree with Lord Mance, in particular, that relying on the possibility that she may be able to summon up the resources, mental and financial, to travel to Great Britain for an abortion if anything makes matters worse rather than better. This conclusion is reinforced by the recent Report of the CEDAW Committee. This contains a helpful discussion of the difficulties of travelling out of Northern Ireland for abortion, which it concludes is not a viable solution (paras 25 to 32).

  28. The third type of case with which we are concerned, that of foetal abnormality, does have to be separated into cases where the foetus suffers from a fatal abnormality, one which will cause death either in the womb or very shortly after delivery, and other serious abnormalities. Both share the feature that the pregnancy may have been very much wanted by the woman, and her partner, and the news of the abnormality will have been doubly devastating. But in the case of fatal foetal abnormality, there can be no community interest in obliging the woman to carry the pregnancy to term if she does not wish to do so. There is no viable life to protect. It is, of course, essential that the diagnosis be as accurate as possible, but we have the evidence of Professor Dornan that, before the law was clarified in Family Planning Association of Northern Ireland v Minister for Health, Social Security and Public Safety [2004] NICA 39; [2005] NI 188, abortions were offered in such cases and there was a high level of accuracy in the diagnosis. Travelling to Great Britain is even more difficult in such cases, as the problem is often detected comparatively late in the pregnancy, at 18 to 20 weeks, which leaves very little time to make the arrangements and there may be no counselling offered on what the options are. If the woman does manage to travel, not only will she have all the trauma and expense associated with that, but also serious problems in arranging the repatriation of the foetal remains.

    Page 11

  29. Serious foetal abnormality is a different matter. The CEDAW committee has obviously had some difficulty in reconciling its views on the legalisation of abortion, which it systematically recommends in all cases (Report, para 58), with the views of the United Nations Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Thus the CEDAW Committee states (Report, para 60):

    "The Committee interprets articles 12 and 16, clarified by GR Nos 24 and 28, read with articles 2 and 5, to require States parties to legalise abortion, at least in cases of rape, incest, threats to the life and/or health (physical or mental) of the woman, or severe foetal impairment."

    The Committee has not taken the view it does of the legalisation of abortion because there is an express provision to that effect in the Convention: it has taken the view that it is the inescapable conclusion from the rights which the Convention does recognise. Article 12 requires State parties to eliminate discrimination against women in the field of health care, in order to ensure equality between men and women in access to health care services. Article 16 requires the same in relation to family relations, including the right to decide freely and responsibly on the number and spacing of children. Article 2 is a general prohibition of discrimination against women and requires positive steps to achieve equality between men and women. Article 5 requires, inter alia, the elimination of practices based on the inferiority or superiority of either of the sexes or on stereotypical roles for men and women.

  30. However (Report, para 62):

    "In cases of severe foetal impairment, the Committee aligns itself with the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in the condemnation of sex-selective and disability-selective abortions, both stemming from the need to combat negative stereotypes and prejudices towards women and persons with disabilities. While the Committee consistently recommends that abortion on the ground of severe foetal impairment be available to facilitate reproductive choice and autonomy, States parties are obligated to ensure that women's decisions to terminate pregnancies on this ground do not perpetuate stereotypes towards persons with disabilities. Such measures should include the provision of appropriate social and financial support for women who choose to carry such pregnancies to term."

    Page 12

  31. Accordingly, the CEDAW Committee recommended to the UK that it adopt legislation legalising abortion "at least" where there is a threat to the pregnant woman's physical or mental health; rape or incest; and severe foetal impairment, including fatal foetal abnormality "without perpetuating stereotypes towards persons with disabilities and ensuring appropriate and ongoing support, social and financial, for women who decide to carry such pregnancies to term" (para 85). As already stated, the guarantees contained in the ECHR should be interpreted in the light of other relevant international human rights instruments. Some may think that the CEDAW Committee's recommendations strike the right balance, but I recognise and understand that others may think that they do not give sufficient weight to the valuable and rewarding lives led by many people with serious disabilities.

    Article 3

  32. Article 3 differs from article 8 in several ways. First, the right not to be subjected to torture or inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment is absolute - it is not to be balanced against any other rights, including the right to life of people whose lives might be saved if, for example, a prisoner were tortured in order to discover their whereabouts. Second, therefore, the treatment complained of has to reach what is referred to as a "minimum level of severity" but which actually means a high level of severity in order to attract the prohibition. Third, although the motive with which the treatment is inflicted may be relevant, the principal focus is upon the effect upon the victim.

  33. I have no doubt that the risk of prosecution of the woman, and of those who help her, thus forcing her to take that risk if she procures an illegal abortion in Northern Ireland, or to travel to Great Britain if she is able to arrange that, constitutes "treatment" by the State for this purpose. It is the State which is subjecting her to the agonising dilemma. I also have little doubt that there will be some women whose suffering on being denied a lawful abortion in Northern Ireland, in the three situations under discussion here, will reach the threshold of severity required to label the treatment "inhuman or degrading".

  34. This is another respect in which article 3 is unlike article 8. In every case where a woman is denied a lawful abortion in Northern Ireland which she seeks in the three situations under discussion, her article 8 rights have been violated. But it cannot be said that every woman who is denied an abortion in such circumstances will suffer so severely that her rights under article 3 have been violated. It depends upon an intense focus on the facts of the individual case which the article 8 question, at least in the three cases under discussion, does not. This is not a situation, as it is under article 8, where the operation of the law is bound to produce incompatible results in every case. But neither is it a situation where the law can always be operated compatibly with the Convention rights if the public authority takes care to

    Page 13

    act in a way which respects those rights. Rather, it is a situation in which the law is bound to operate incompatibly in some cases. I have sympathy for the view expressed by Lord Kerr that the risk of acting incompatibly with article 3 rights is such as to engage the positive obligation of the state to prevent that risk materialising; but it is unnecessary to decide the point, in the light of my conclusion that the present law is incompatible with article 8 in the three respects discussed above.

    Remedy

  35. I have reached the following conclusions (i) that the NIHRC does have standing to challenge the legislation in question here; (ii) that, in denying a lawful abortion in Northern Ireland to a woman who wishes it in cases of rape, incest and fatal foetal abnormality, the law is incompatible with article 8 of the Convention; and (iii) that it will also operate incompatibly with article 3 of the Convention in some cases.

  36. I agree, for the reasons given by Lord Kerr, that the incompatibility with article 8 cannot be cured by further reading down of section 58 of the Offences against the Person Act 1861 under section 3 of the HRA. Should we therefore make a declaration of incompatibility under section 4 of the HRA? I understand, of course, the view that this is a matter which should be left entirely to the democratic judgment of the Northern Ireland Assembly (or the United Kingdom Government should direct rule have to be resumed). But I respectfully disagree for several reasons.

  37. First, although the Strasbourg court was prepared to accord Ireland a wide measure of appreciation in the A, B and C case, that was, as the minority pointed out, most unusual. It cannot be guaranteed that the Strasbourg court would afford the United Kingdom the same margin of appreciation in this case, given that public opinion in Northern Ireland is very different from assumed public opinion in Ireland at the time of the events in A, B and C. In any event, even if it did, that does not answer the question. It means only that the United Kingdom authorities have to decide what is, or is not, compatible with the Convention rights.

  38. Second, this is not a matter on which the democratic legislature enjoys a unique competence. It is a matter of fundamental human rights on which, difficult though it is, the courts are as well qualified to judge as is the legislature. In fact, in some ways, the courts may be thought better qualified, because they are able to weigh the evidence, the legal materials, and the arguments in a dispassionate manner, without the external pressures to which legislators may be subject. It falls within the principle accepted by the House of Lords in In re G (Adoption:

    Page 14

    Unmarried Couple) [2009] AC 173 and indeed by the majority of this Court in R (Nicklinson) v Ministry of Justice (CNK Alliance Ltd intervening) [2015] AC 657.

  39. Third, Parliament has expressly given the higher courts the power to rule upon the compatibility or incompatibility of legislation with the Convention rights. Parliament did not say, when enacting section 4 of the HRA, "but there are some cases where, even though you are satisfied that the law is incompatible with the Convention rights, you must leave the decision to us". Parliamentary sovereignty is respected, not by our declining to make a declaration, but by what happens if and when we do. Parliament has three options. First, it may share the court's view and approve a "fast track" remedial order under section 10 of the HRA, which is appropriate if the matter is quite simple and easy to solve. Second, it may share our view and pass an Act of Parliament to put things right, which is appropriate if the matter is not simple and easy to solve, and complex arrangements have to be put in place. Third, it may do nothing. This could be because it disagrees with court's view, and prefers to wait and see what view is eventually taken by the European Court of Human Rights. Or it could be because it is inclined to leave matters as they are for the time being. The "do nothing" option is no doubt more attractive if the matter is one which Strasbourg would regard as within the UK's margin of appreciation. It is at this point that the democratic will, as expressed through the elected representatives of the people, rules the day.

  40. All that a declaration on incompatibility does, therefore, is place the ball in Parliament's court. This is not a case like Nicklinson in which the matter was already before Parliament and the issues were not as clear cut: the case had changed from one of active euthanasia to one of assisted suicide in the course of its progress through the courts. In this case, if the court has reached a firm conclusion that the law is incompatible there is little reason not to say so, particularly where, as here, the UK has already been advised that the law is in breach of its international human rights obligations under another treaty.

  41. I would therefore have allowed this appeal and made a declaration accordingly, but in the light of the majority's view of the standing of the NIHRC to bring these proceedings it must follow that we have no jurisdiction formally to declare the majority's view. But, as Lord Mance explains in para 135 that does not mean that it can safely be ignored.

    Page 15

    LORD MANCE:

    Summary

  42. (a) By these proceedings against the Department of Justice and the Attorney General for Northern Ireland ("the respondents"), the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission ("the Commission") challenges the compatibility of the law in Northern Ireland with articles 3 and 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights ("the Convention rights"), insofar as that law prohibits abortion in cases of fatal and other foetal abnormality, rape and incest.

    (b) The respondents raise an initial objection to the challenge, that it is outside the Commission's competence (in the sense of power) to institute abstract proceedings of this nature (an actio popularis). I deal with this issue in paras 47 to 72. The courts below considered that the Commission had competence. The Supreme Court concludes by a majority, consisting of Lord Reed, Lady Black, Lord Lloyd-Jones and myself, that the objection is wellfounded and that the courts below were wrong on this issue.

    (c) It follows that the Supreme Court has no jurisdiction to give any relief in respect of the challenge to Northern Ireland abortion law. But that challenge has been fully argued, and evidence has been put before the Court about a number of specific cases. It would, in the circumstances, be unrealistic and unhelpful to refuse to express the conclusions at which I would have arrived, had I concluded that the Commission had competence to pursue the challenge.

    (d) I would have concluded, without real hesitation at the end of the day, that the current state of Northern Ireland law is incompatible with article 8 of the Convention, insofar as it prohibits abortion in cases of fatal foetal abnormality, rape and incest, but not insofar as it prohibits abortion in cases of serious foetal abnormality: see paras 73 to 134. That conclusion, obiter in my case, is of the essence of the judgments of the three members of the Court (Lady Hale, Lord Kerr and Lord Wilson) who (dissenting) would have held that the Commission had competence. Lady Black would (obiter) reach the same conclusion as I do with regard to fatal foetal abnormality, but not rape or incest. Lord Kerr and Lord Wilson would go further than I would have done and hold that the current law in Northern Ireland law is also incompatible with article 3 of the Convention rights as regards fatal foetal abnormality, rape and incest. Lady Hale's view on this point appears in paras 28 to 30 of her judgment.

    Page 16

    (e) With that summary, I will turn to introduce the proceedings more fully. However, those who may at the outset wish to have an idea of the distressing cases to which the Commission has drawn attention in the context of its challenge can look at once at paras 84 to 90 below.

    Introduction

  43. This is an appeal in proceedings for judicial review commenced by the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission ("the Commission") on 11 December 2014. By their Order 53 statement, the Commission sought general relief, unrelated to any particular set of facts, consisting of:

    1. A declaration "pursuant to section 6 and section 4" of the Human Rights Act 1998 ("the HRA") that sections 58 and 59 of the Offences against the Person Act 1861 ("the 1861 Act") and section 25 of the Criminal Justice Act (NI) 1945 ("the 1945 Act") are incompatible with articles 3, 8 and 14 of the European Convention on Human Rights so far as "they relate to access to termination of pregnancy services for women with pregnancies involving a serious malformation of the foetus or pregnancy as a result of rape or incest";

    2. A declaration that, notwithstanding the provisions of the above sections, "women in Northern Ireland may lawfully access termination of pregnancy services within Northern Ireland in cases of serious malformation of the foetus or rape or incest";

    3. A declaration that "the rights of women in Northern Ireland with a diagnosis of serious malformation of the foetus or who are pregnant as a result of such rape or incest" are breached by the above sections; and/or d. such further or other relief as the Court might think appropriate.

  44. The declarations sought to focus on three broad situations: serious malformation of the foetus; rape; and incest. In this judgment, I shall divide the first into fatal foetal abnormality and serious (but not fatal) foetal abnormality. The expert evidence before the judge indicated that doctors are well capable of identifying cases of fatal foetal abnormality, that is cases where the foetus will die in the womb or during or very shortly after birth. As to rape, it was made clear during the course of submissions before the Supreme Court, that the Commission, when commencing these proceedings, had in mind situations in which, because a child was under the age of 13, consent cannot in law be given, but had not focused on, for example, sexual offences (not described in law as rape) committed against children aged 13 or more, but under the age of 16. I return to this aspect in paras 73 and 131 below. As to incest, there was again no detailed examination of the offence(s) in question. There is no longer any offence called, in law rather than colloquially, incest. Since 2008, the relevant law is found in articles 32 to 36 and 68 to 69 of the Sexual Offences (Northern Ireland) Order 2008, mirroring sections 25 to 29 and 64 to 65 of the Sexual Offences Act 2003 in England and Wales. These articles introduce a very wide range of penetrative offences involving related persons, but it is only those which can lead to pregnancy which are presently relevant. In this context, article 32 contains offences under the head "Sexual activity with a child family member". This is capable of commission where the child family member (B) is either under 18, and is someone who the person committing the offence (A) does not reasonably believe to be 18 or over, or is under 13. The relevant family relationships are defined in section 34, and the maximum punishment on conviction on indictment of an offence involving penetration of the vagina is up to 14 years. Article 68 contains the offence of "Sex with an adult relative: penetration", which may, inter alia, be committed when a person aged 16 or over (A) penetrates the vagina of (B) aged 18 or over. Article 69 contains the offence of "Sex with an adult relative: consenting to penetration", which may be committed where A (aged 18 or over) penetrates the vagina of B (aged 16 or over) with B's consent. Articles 68 and 69 have their own definition of the prohibited relationships, and the maximum sentence on conviction of indictment is in each case up to two years. For convenience, I shall in this judgment continue to use the colloquial term incest to refer to all three offences, although it is clear that the legislator has identified a significant general difference between offences under article 32 involving a child family member on the one hand and offences under articles 68 and 69 involving adults. I shall consider the position in respect of incest in greater detail in paras 127 to 131 below.

  45. In support of its Order 53 statement, the Commission's Chief Commissioner, Mr Les Allamby, swore an affidavit, confirming that the Commission's case was made pursuant to section 4 of the HRA and based on alleged incompatibility with Convention Rights of the sections identified above of both the 1861 and the 1945 Acts. In other words, it treated both Acts as primary legislation. On that basis, it is not clear on what basis it could have been thought that any relief could be granted beyond that identified in sub-para (1). Just conceivably, sub-paras (2) and (4) may have been framed to cover the possibility of a more expansive interpretation of the Bourne exception (deriving from R v Bourne [1939] 1 KB 687), along the lines which the Lord Chief Justice accepted in the Court of Appeal: para 79. Be that as it may be, while the 1861 Act is clearly primary legislation, the same cannot in my opinion be said of the 1945 Act. The 1945 Act was an Act of the Parliament of Northern Ireland, established by the Government of Ireland Act 1920. In terms of the HRA, it constitutes subordinate, rather than primary, legislation: see the definitions in section 21 of the HRA, and in particular paragraph (c) in relation to "subordinate legislation". For present purposes, this point may not prove significant, since it is unclear what section 25 of the 1945 Act adds, at least in law, to sections

    Page 18

    58 and 59 of the 1861 Act. Brice Dickson's Law in Northern Ireland, para 7.17, instances the 1945 Act as one of a number introduced in the face of jury reluctance to convict of existing offences with greater overtones of evilness in the same areas.

  46. Before the Supreme Court, the first issue is whether it was within the Commission's competence to seek the relief identified in sub-paragraph 43 above, that is a general declaration of incompatibility in relation to primary legislation of the United Kingdom Parliament. This issue is raised both in direct response to the Commission's claim and pursuant to devolution questions referred to the Supreme Court under section 33 of the Northern Ireland Act 1998 ("the NI Act 1998") by the Attorney General for Northern Ireland by notice dated 18 January 2017. The devolution questions which have been referred ask, in summary, whether the Commission was empowered to institute human rights proceedings or seek a declaration of incompatibility other than as respects an identified unlawful act or acts.

  47. Only if it was within the Commission's competence to issue proceedings for the relief claimed, could the court make any declaration of incompatibility, even if incompatibility was otherwise established. The second issue, arising strictly only if the Commission had such competence, is whether any incompatibility is established. Both Horner J and the Court of Appeal held that the Commission had such competence. Having so held, Horner J went on to conclude that there was incompatibility, but only in so far as it is an offence to procure a miscarriage (a) at any stage during a pregnancy where the foetus has been diagnosed with a fatal foetal abnormality, or (b) up to the date when the foetus is capable of being born alive where a pregnancy arises as a result of rape or incest. The Court of Appeal, in three differently reasoned judgments, concluded that there was no incompatibility. The respondents, the Department of Justice and the Attorney General for Northern Ireland, appeal on the first issue, while the Commission appeals on the second issue.

    The Commission's competence to seek the relief claimed

  48. Logically, the issue of the Commission's competence should be taken first, and I propose to do so, although in the event it will also be appropriate to express views on the issue of incompatibility, which has been fully argued.

  49. The Commission is a body corporate created by section 68 of the NI Act 1998. It was accepted by the House of Lords in In re Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission [2002] NI 236 that it only has such powers as are conferred on it by statute, though these can "clearly include such powers as may fairly be regarded as incidental to or consequential upon those things which the legislature has

    Page 19

    authorised": ibid, p 243C. The relevant statutory provisions in the current legislation define the Commission's functions as follows:

    "69. The Commission's functions.

    (1) The Commission shall keep under review the adequacy and effectiveness in Northern Ireland of law and practice relating to the protection of human rights.

    (2) The Commission shall, before the end of the period of two years beginning with the commencement of this section, make to the Secretary of State such recommendations as it thinks fit for improving -

    (a) its effectiveness;

    (b) the adequacy and effectiveness of the functions conferred on it by this Part; and

    (c) the adequacy and effectiveness of the provisions of this Part relating to it.

    (3) The Commission shall advise the Secretary of State and the Executive Committee of the Assembly of legislative and other measures which ought to be taken to protect human rights -

    (a) as soon as reasonably practicable after receipt of a general or specific request for advice; and

    (b) on such other occasions as the Commission thinks appropriate.

    (4) The Commission shall advise the Assembly whether a Bill is compatible with human rights -

    (a) as soon as reasonably practicable after receipt of a request for advice; and

    Page 20

    (b) on such other occasions as the Commission thinks appropriate.

    (5) The Commission may -

    (a) give assistance to individuals in accordance with section 70; and

    (b) bring proceedings involving law or practice relating to the protection of human rights.

    (6) The Commission shall promote understanding and awareness of the importance of human rights in Northern Ireland; and for this purpose it may undertake, commission or provide financial or other assistance for -

    (a) research; and

    (b) educational activities.

    (7) The Secretary of State shall request the Commission to provide advice of the kind referred to in para 4 of the Human Rights section of the Belfast Agreement ...

    (8A) The Commission shall publish a report of its findings on an investigation.

    (8) For the purpose of exercising its functions under this section the Commission may conduct such investigations as it considers necessary or expedient ...

    (9) The Commission may decide to publish its advice and the outcome of its research ...

    (10) The Commission shall do all that it can to ensure the establishment of the committee referred to in paragraph 10 of that section of that Agreement.

    Page 21

    (11) In this section -

    (a) a reference to the Assembly includes a reference to a committee of the Assembly;

    (b) 'human rights' includes the Convention rights."

  50. Section 70 of the NI Act reads:

    "70. Assistance by Commission.

    (1) This section applies to -

    (a) proceedings involving law or practice relating to the protection of human rights which a person in Northern Ireland has commenced, or wishes to commence; or

    (b) proceedings in the course of which such a person relies, or wishes to rely, on such law or practice.

    (2) Where the person applies to the Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission for assistance in relation to proceedings to which this section applies, the Commission may grant the application on any of the following grounds -

    (a) that the case raises a question of principle;

    (b) that it would be unreasonable to expect the person to deal with the case without assistance because of its complexity, or because of the person's position in relation to another person involved, or for some other reason;

    (c) that there are other special circumstances which make it appropriate for the Commission to provide assistance.

    Page 22

    (3) Where the Commission grants an application under subsection (2) it may

    (a) provide, or arrange for the provision of, legal advice;

    (b) arrange for the provision of legal representation;

    (c) provide any other assistance which it thinks appropriate.

    (4) Arrangements made by the Commission for the provision of assistance to a person may include provision for recovery of expenses from the person in certain circumstances."

  51. Section 71 reads as follows:

    "71. Restrictions on application of rights.

    (1) Nothing in section 6(2)(c) or 24(1)(a) shall enable a person -

    (a) to bring any proceedings in a court or tribunal on the ground that any legislation or act is incompatible with the Convention rights; or

    (b) to rely on any of the Convention rights in any such proceedings unless he would be a victim for the purposes of article 34 of the Convention if proceedings in respect of the legislation or act were brought in the European Court of Human Rights.

    (2) Subsection (1) does not apply to the Attorney General, the Advocate General for Northern Ireland, the Attorney General for Northern Ireland, the Advocate General for Scotland or the Lord Advocate.

    Page 23

    (2A) Subsection (1) does not apply to the Commission.

    (2B) In relation to the Commission's instituting, or intervening in, human rights proceedings -

    (a) the Commission need not be a victim or potential victim of the unlawful act to which the proceedings relate,

    (b) section 7(3) and (4) of the Human Rights Act 1998 (c 42) (breach of Convention rights: sufficient interest, &c) shall not apply,

    (c) the Commission may act only if there is or would be one or more victims of the unlawful act, and

    (d) no award of damages may be made to the Commission (whether or not the exception in section 8(3) of that Act applies).

    (2C) For the purposes of subsection (2B) -

    (a) 'human rights proceedings' means proceedings which rely (wholly or partly) on -

    (i) section 7(1)(b) of the Human Rights Act 1998, or

    (ii) section 69(5)(b) of this Act, and

    (b) an expression used in subsection (2B) and in section 7 of the Human Rights Act 1998 has the same meaning in subsection (2B) as in section 7.

    (3) Section 6(2)(c) -

    Page 24

    (a) does not apply to a provision of an Act of the Assembly if the passing of the Act is, by virtue of subsection (2) of section 6 of the Human Rights Act 1998, not unlawful under subsection (1) of that section; and

    (b) does not enable a court or tribunal to award in respect of the passing of an Act of the Assembly any damages which it could not award on finding the passing of the Act unlawful under that subsection.

    (4) Section 24(1)(a) -

    (a) does not apply to an act which, by virtue of subsection (2) of section 6 of the Human Rights Act 1998, is not unlawful under subsection (1) of that section; and

    (b) does not enable a court or tribunal to award in respect of an act any damages which it could not award on finding the act unlawful under that subsection.

    (5) In this section 'the Convention' has the same meaning as in the Human Rights Act 1998."

  52. Sections 6(2)(c) and 24(1)(a), to which reference is made at the start of section 71 address the legislative competence of, respectively, the Northern Ireland Assembly and of Northern Irish Ministers and departments, as follows:

    "6. Legislative competence.

    (1) A provision of an Act is not law if it is outside the legislative competence of the Assembly.

    (2) A provision is outside that competence if any of the following paragraphs apply -

    Page 25

    (a) it would form part of the law of a country or territory other than Northern Ireland, or confer or remove functions...

To continue reading

REQUEST YOUR TRIAL